Advice for events and social gatherings

There are restrictions on how many can be gathered. It is important that we all follow the given advice and restrictions. Specific rules may apply in municipalities with a high level of infection. Refer to the website of the local municipality.

Familie som feirer bursdag sammen

Illustrasjon: Daria Petrenko / Mostphotos

Rules and definitions for events at a public venue

Requirements for hosting an event at a public venue

  • The rules on how many can be gathered must be followed.
  • A shoulder-to-shoulder distance of at least 1 metre should be kept
  • The premises or outdoors area must be large enough to accommodate the given requirements on keeping a distance.
  • A responsible organizer must be designated.
  • Keep an overview of who is present by writing down their names and contact details to allow for contact tracing. The information must be deleted after 14 days.
  • Only people who are healthy should be present.
  • Events with a licence to serve alcohol must follow the rules that apply for venues serving food or alcohol. See also rules for venues serving food and tips for preparing and serving food.
  • There is no longer a rule restricting people to enter an event after midnight, when a corona certificate is used.

If the venue has designated seating, everyone should be given tickets / seats with sufficient distance in between. Those who are part of the same household can move closer to each other after arrival.

Definition of a private event

The definition of a public event includes:

  • Sports events (not including training).
  • Cultural events, concerts, exhibition openings, opera, ballet, theatre and cinema (not including practice and training).
  • Seminars, conferences, courses and other professional gatherings without alcohol being served.
  • Religious gatherings and ceremonies.
  • Trade union and other membership meetings

Dugnad, trade fairs and temporary markets

A "dugnad" e.g. in a local community or a sports club is not considered an event and can be carried out. Social gatherings linked to a dugnad is on the other hand considered an event.

Trade fairs and temporary markets can operate in the same way as a shopping centre but must register the contact details of those visiting. See the recommendation for shopping centres at helsedirektoratet.no (in Norwegian).

Private events at a public venue

A private gathering includes:  

  • Gathering family, friends and acquaintances.
  • A social gathering in connection with work or school.
  • A gathering that directly follows a ceremony, such as a baptism, wedding, confirmation or funeral.
  • A dinner party or party where alcohol is served and that directly follows a seminar, conference, course or other professional event.

What is considered as a public venue?

A public place refers to a place intended for public access or a place that the public frequent. Premises or outdoor areas that you can rent or borrow, including hotels, community centres, conference rooms and halls, is also considered a public venue.

Responsible organiser

The responsible organiser should keep an overview of who is present, pass information on infection control on to those invited and make sure the rules are followed. The responsible organiser can either be you as the lessee (the person renting the premises) or the lessor (the owner/landlord renting out the premises). This should be agreed upon in advance, prior to hosting the event. If you rent a venue without a clear agreement with the lessor as to who is the responsible organiser, you yourself as the lessee will typically be held accountable.

The guests and participants must be informed about who the organizer is and who to contact for questions related to measures for infection control.

Who is not counted as a participant?

The following persons are not counted as part of the total number of participants present at the event:

  • Employees or contractors who are responsible for implementing the event
  • Performing artists during a cultural activity as arranged by a professional organiser
  • Top athletes, support staff and referees during a sports event
  • Journalists, photo journalists and other media representatives required to ensure media coverage of the event.

At a culture, sports and leisure event for children and young people under the age of 20, everyone who is present is considered a participant, including athletes and support staff.

Events with a COVID-19 certificate

A higher number of participants is allowed at an event that involve the use of the COVID-19 certificate as compared to an event without the use of the COVID-19 certificate.

Only 50% of the capacity at the premises is allowed to use for events where the COVID-19 certificate is being used. The distance requirement and the other rules that apply to events also apply when using the COVID-19 certificate. It is therefore important not to have a higher number of participants than what space and capacity allows for.

Number of participants for indoor events with the COVID-19 certificate:

  • 1500 participants, split in cohorts of up to 500 participants each, without designated seating.
  • 5000 participants, split in cohorts of up to 500 participants each, with designated seating.

Number of participants for outdoor events with the COVID-19 certificate:

  • 3000 participants, split in cohorts of up to 500 participants each, without designated seating.
  • 10.000 participants, split in cohorts of up to 500 participants each, with designated seating.

About the COVID-19 certificate

A negative test result that is less than 24 hours old or a status as protected will grant a green COVID-19 certificate. It will be possible to use the COVID-19 certificate at larger events, such as concerts, theatres, football matches and festivals, as well as domestic coastal cruises.

Read more about the COVID-19 certificate here.

The test should be the rapid antige-based test and is free of charge. You will need to make sure the test is taken in due time yourself. You will be given clear information from the organizer or test provider for the event or coastal cruise.

Here is what you need to do prior to the event to be able to present your green COVID-19 certificate:

  • Log on at helsenorge.no to see of your COVID-19 certificate is valid or not well in advance of the event.
  • You must present a green control page to enter an event.
  • Pay attention to information from the organizer on where to take a test.
  • You must take the test well in advance of the event. The test is valid for 24 hours from the time the test result is registered at helsenorge.no.
  • It will take up to 1 hour from the time you take the test until the test result will be visible in your COVID-19 certificate at helsenorge.no.
  • A negative test result will trigger a green COVID-19 certificate for 24 hours.
  • To avoid queuing, you should prepare and be ready to present the certificate before you arrive at the control point.
  • If you do not have access to the internet, you can download a copy of the certificate on your mobile or make a printout in advance.
  • The inspector will scan the QR-code on the Norwegian inspection page.

See your COVID-19 certificate here!

Events without a COVID-19 certificate

The use of a COVID-19 certificate is not required. Only a lower number of participants is allowed for events without the COVID-19 certificate. The distance requirement and other rules that apply for events must be followed. It is important not to allow for a higher number of participants than what space allows.

Number of participants for indoor events without the COVID-19 certificate:

  • 400 participants, split in cohorts of up to 200 participants each, without designated seating.
  • 1000 participants, split in cohorts of up to 500 participants each, with designated seating.

Number of participants for outdoor events without the COVID-19 certificate:

  • 800 participants, split in cohorts of up to 200 participants each, without designated seating.
  • 2000 participants, split in cohorts of up to 500 participants each, with designated seating.

Private gathering at a public venue

Private gatherings at a public venue are regulated. The distance requirement and other rules that apply for events must be followed. It is also important not to allow for a higher number of participants than what space allows.

Private gatherings include:  

  • Gathering family, friends and acquaintances.
  • A social gathering in connection with work or school.
  • A gathering that directly follows a ceremony, such as a baptism, wedding, confirmation or funeral.
  • A dinner party or party where alcohol is served and that directly follows a seminar, conference, course or other professional event.

It is not allowed to gather more than 100 people for a private event at a public venue (rented / borrowed premises), This also includes protected persons, given that there is no system allowing for private individuals to check the COVID-19 certificate of the participants.

Persons from an area with a high level of infection and who are not protected should not taker part oin events in other municipalities.

Gathering at a private venue

You should not have more than a maximum of 20 guests visiting in addition to those who are part of your own household. This applies both indoors and outdoors, in your own house, holiday property or garden.

We should all keep a distance of one meter, hence wit is important not to have more guests than space allows for. 

Meeting up outdoors is recommended.

Persons who are protected are not included when counting the guests. See definition of protected here. Protected persons may have close social contact (less than one meter) with others that are protected as well as with non-protected persons who are not part of a risk group.

Children and youth  can visit  their cohort in kindergarten or primary school. See further information on children and youth here.

If you live in an area with stricter rules on the number of guests visiting, you have to follow them. Visit the website of the specific municipality here (list in Norwegian).

We should all limit the frequency and number of people we go visit or who visit us. Nor should we have too many close contacts. Keeping a distance to others is typically easier outdoors rather than indoors.

Organised sports and leisure activities

Organised indoor sports and leisure activities for adults in groups of up to a maximum of 30 persons are allowed. There is no longer a requirement of keeping a distance of at least one metre during the activity.

Organised outdoor sports and leisure activities for adults in groups of up to a maximum of 40 persons are allowed. There is no longer a requirement of keeping a distance of at least one metre during the activity.

Activities should preferably take place outdoors.

Adults are exempted from the 1-meter rule when participating in both outdoors and indoors sporting events within the region/district, e.g. matches and events.

Children and young people under the age of 20 can participate in both outdoors and indoors sports events or competitions across regions / districts (nationally), without having to keep a 1 meter distance. See more about children and young people here.

Top athletes can train as normal both indoors and outdoors.

Serving food and alcohol

Preparing and serving food

It is important that both those preparing the food and the guests are healthy and keep a good hand hygiene. The guests can use the same serving tools, but everyone needs to use their own cutlery. Avoid finger food.

If you want further information about food and drink, read more at the website of the Norwegian Food Safety Authority.

Requirements for venues serving food or alcohol

Venues serving food or alcohol can stay open, provided the rules for proper operation are followed.  See the definition of proper operation at heledirektoratet.no (in Norwegian). Venues can be restaurants, cafes, bars, pubs, nightclubs etc. They must ensure a distance of at least one metre between guests when seated.

  • Venues with a licence to serve alcohol cannot admit new guest after midnight (12 PM).
  • Alcohol should be served at the table.

Requirement on contact details registration

Venues serving food or alcohol should register contact details provided the guest agrees to this. The information will allow the municipality to get in touch with you in the event of contact tracing. The required information includes telephone number, date and time of your visit and if possible, where you were seated. The venue should inform what the contact details is to be used for. Due to privacy principles, the information must be deleted after 14 days.