Overview of rules and recommendations

Here you will find an overview of both local and national rules and recommendations. Local rules and measures for infection control might be stricter than the national rules and measures.

Local rules and recommendations

Do you need to find out what advice and guidelines apply in a specific municipality? Visit the website of the specific municipality here.

Local rules are regulated and must be followed. A local recommendation is not regulated by law but should also be followed.

What applies to those who are fully vaccinated or have had COVID-19?

Take a test and stay at home if you have symptoms

Anyone who develops symptoms of a coronavirus infection should take a test and stay at home. This also applies to those who are vaccinated.

Read more about testing and symptoms here.

Transmission quarantine, testing and close contacts

The transmission quarantine duty is no longer a rule.  If you are a close contact of someone who is infected, you are exempt from the recommended testing if you are vaccinated or have had COVID-19.

Isolation

You must be in isolation if you test positive for a coronavirus infection. This is regulated by law, and violation is a criminal offence. See the rules on isolation here.

Travel

Anyone over the age of 16 years old must complete the travel registration form when entering Norway.

If you are fully vaccinated or undergone COVID-19 during the ­­preceding six months period you do not need to: 

  • present a negative test result prior to entry
  • undego testing upon arrival
  • enter a travel quarantine.

You must be able to document this via a valid COVID-19 certificate.

Read more about travels to Norway

Events, leisure activities and social gatherings

The rules and recommendations for events, leisure activities and social gatherings are now lifted. You do no longer ned to keep a distance of at least one metre or limit the number of guests in your own home.

COVID-19 certificates are no longer in use at events in Norway but are still in use when travelling.

High risk groups

There are still some who are at a higher risk of developing a more serious course of the disease if infected by the coronavirus. Some of them might not be able to take the vaccine. Hence it is important that we all undergo testing and stay at home if we turn ill, wash our hands frequently and take the vaccine.

Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding

The risk of serious illness among pregnant women who become infected with coronavirus is low. At the same time, international studies show that pregnant women are somewhat more likely to have a serious course of covid-19t disease than non-pregnant women.

To prevent infection, you should follow the same advice as the general population. Talk to you doctor if you have questions e.g. related to the vaccine.

Work and working from home

You should not go to work if you develop symptoms of COVID-19, unless you test negative for the coronavirus and your general health condition is good.

What applies to those who are not vaccinated?

Take a test if you have symptoms

Anyone who develops symptoms of a coronavirus infection should take a test and stay at home.

Vaccination

Taking the coronavirus vaccine is recommended for everyone over the age of 16 years old. The recommendation is mainly linked to the risk of developing a more severe progression of the disease if you are infected.

Vaccines are also offered to those who are 12 years and older. Taking the vaccine is optional for all.

Transmission quarantine

The transmission quarantine duty is no longer a rule. If you however are a close contact of someone who is infected, you should undergo testing as described below.

Testing of close contacts

Those who are part of the same household or a similar close contact of a person with a confirmed coronavirus infection - but who are not vaccinated - should either avoid contact with others over a 7-days period or undergo testing as described below.

A close contact can for example be a boyfriend / girlfriend, your best friend or someone who have stayed overnight at your place.

Testing of household members and similar close contacts

Take a test as soon as possible after you being defined as a close contact of a person with a confirmed coronavirus infection. Following this first test, you should undergo additional testing:

  • Every day for 7 days (rapid antigen-based self-test)

or

  • Every second day for 7 days (PCR-based test)

Testing of other close contacts

Other close contact who are not part of the same household as the person who has a confirmed coronavirus infection are not required to undergo testing but are still encouraged to do so (rapid antigen-based self-test or PCR-based test).

Isolation

You must be in isolation if you test positive for a coronavirus infection. This is regulated by law, and violation is a criminal offence. See the rules on isolation here.

Travel

If you arrive in Norway from a red, dark-red, purple og grey area or country and are not vaccinated you will need to complete a travel registration form prior to crossing the border, take a test for the coronavirus upon arrival to Norway and enter a travel quarantine. You can take a second test for the coronavirus (PCR-based test) three days after arrival at the earliest and end your quarantine if this test comes back negative. You must be able to document the test result.

Events, leisure activities and social gatherings

The rules and recommendations for events, leisure activities and social gatherings are now lifted. You do no longer ned to keep a distance of at least one metre or limit the number of guests in your own home.

COVID-19 certificates are no longer in use at events in Norway but are still in use when travelling.

 

Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding

The risk of serious illness among pregnant women who become infected with coronavirus is low. At the same time, international studies show that pregnant women are somewhat more likely to have a serious course of covid-19t disease than non-pregnant women.

To prevent infection, you should follow the same advice as the general population. Talk to you doctor if you have questions e.g. related to the vaccine.

Work and working from home

You should not go to work if you develop symptoms of COVID-19, unless you test negative for the coronavirus and your general health condition is good.

Children and youth

Children who develop new symptoms such as fever, coughing, a sore throat, or a reduced general condition should stay at home and not go to school or kindergarten. This also applies to children who are vaccinated. Testing for the coronavirus can be considered in consultation with parents and guardians if symptoms arise or the child has been in close contact with someone who has a confirmed coronavirus infection.

A child with a runny nose as the only symptom and who is otherwise in a good general condition does not need to stay at home or undergo testing. The same applies if they show symptoms of a known allergy.