Kindergarten, schools and higher education

What applies to kindergarten and schools at present? Can I go study abroad for one semester?

School playground

Illustration: Johnér

Advice for infection control in kindergarten and school

Guidelines for infection control

The measures for infection control in schools and kindergarten will vary based on the local level of infection in the municipality. The national guidelines for infection control follow the traffic light model based on the levels green, yellow and red for the measures presented.

Visit the website of the local municipality for information on the level and measures in your municipality.

You can read more about the guidelines here:

The Norwegian Directorate for Education and Training provides information for parents and children. Here you will also find information in different languages.

Exemption from transmission quarantine by regular testing

If you are under 18 years of age to avoid transmission quarantine if someone in your class, leisure activity of group of friends is infected – pending you undergo regular testing.  

If someone in your family/household, your boyfriend/girlfriend or another close contact is infected, you will still need to enter transmission quarantine. A close contact can be a close friend, someone who has stayed overnight at your place, someone with whom you share a room/dorm etc. The contact tracing team in your municipality with assess who your close contacts are.

Testing for persons over 13 years of age who is a close contact

  • When the time of potential infection is not known, or if you over time have been in contact with the person who is infected, testing as soon as possible or on day 1 is recommended. To be exempt from transmission quarantine you will need to take two additional tests with a 48 hour interval, on day 3 and 5. When the time of potential infection is known, testing at day 3 and 5 is recommended.
  • You should keep a distance to others until you receive a negative test result on the first test.

Testing for persons up to 12 years of age, as well as for those in primary school who are 13 years old

  • When the time of potential infection is known, testing at day 3 and 5 is recommended.
  • When the time of potential infection is not known, or if you over time have been in contact with the person who is infected, testing as soon as possible or on day 1 is recommended. To be exempt from transmission quarantine you will need to take an additional test between day 3 and 5.
  • You should keep a distance to others until you receive a negative test result on the first test.

You, or your parents, will be contacted by your local contact tracing team. They will tell you when and where to undergo testing. They will also tell you whether the exception does not apply to you and you will need to be in transmission quarantine.

Read more here about transmission quarantine.

For those over 18 years of age

The Municipal doctor can decide on the exemption from transmission quarantine by regular testing for those over 18 years of age. The same rules as for testing for persons over 13 years of age will then apply. The intention is to facilitate education at educational and training institutions.

Read more here: Testing may in certain situations replace transmission quarantine for children and youth - The Norwegian Directorate of Health  (in Norwegian)

"How much snot is OK?"

The regular, slightly runny nose - quite typical during autumn- and wintertime - is OK if the general condition of the child is otherwise good with no signs of a fever, cough, or a sore throat. Children in kindergarten and primary school with a runny nose as the only symptom but who otherwise are in a good condition do not need to stay at home nor be tested. The same applies for familiar symptoms of an established allergy.

If your child develops symptoms of a respiratory infection (in the last 24 hours), the child must stay at home and should be tested for the coronavirus. This is important especially if the child shows several symptoms, such as a fever, cough, sore throat, stuffy and runny nose or with a reduced general condition.

Flowchart

The Norwegian Institute of Public Health has built a flowchart to help parents assess whether or not a child with respiratory symptoms need to stay at home (FHI.no).

Higher education

Students in Norway

Students can be present in person at universities, colleges, and vocational colleges, with enhanced measures for infection control. Regular testing should be considered.

Registration of who is present – including seat placement - should be made.

The educational institution is responsible for developing their own guidelines for infection control. See questions and answers related to the coronavirus for students in Norway at regjeringen.no. (in Norwegian)

Norwegian students abroad

The Ministry of Education and Research offers information for Norwegian international students (in Norwegian). Here you can read more about travelling back to your place of study and planning for studies abroad.

All Norwegian citizens who are staying abroad are encouraged to register at the travel registration portal (in Norwegian) hosted by the Foreign Ministry. This will allow the Norwegian authorities to quickly contact you if required.