Practical assistance and training

Practical assistance includes help regarding everyday practical tasks around the house and personal care. Help can be provided both inside and outside the home. Some aspects of this help used to be known as ‘home help’.

Practical assistance can also include training to help recipients of personal assistance cope with their everyday tasks and chores.

Examples of practical assistance include:

  • help with shopping
  • cooking
  • washing of clothes and house cleaning
  • snow clearance
  • help with self-care

Assistance with, and training in, personal care and self-care is provided free of charge. The municipality may charge a user fee for other practical assistance and training.

Who is eligible for practical assistance?

You will be entitled to practical assistance if you are dependent on help with your personal care or need help to do your everyday tasks and chores. When you apply for a service, the municipality will consider what you are able to do unaided and what you need help with.

How do I apply for practical assistance?

You can apply to the municipality if you need practical assistance. You should provide a clear and detailed explanation of what you need help with. You should also explain why you need help.

You can find out how to apply on the municipality's website or by contacting the municipality. You should contact your municipality if you need more information or guidance.

Once you have submitted your application, the municipality will be obliged to give you a written decision (individual decision), regardless of whether or not your practical assistance is approved. The decision will be justified and explain your right to appeal and the deadline for any appeal.

You can appeal decisions

You can appeal if you are not satisfied with the decision you have been given.

Your appeal should be sent to the municipality, who will review the case. If the municipality does not uphold your appeal, your case will be referred to the county governor for a final decision.

There is a patient and user ombudsman in every county. You can contact them for advice, guidance and information about your rights as a user or next of kin.