Healthcare following crises, accidents and disasters

It is normal to have all kinds of reactions after a crisis or disaster. If you’re struggling after having experienced a traumatic event, you should consider seeking help.

Crisis care in your municipality

In an emergency situation, the municipality is responsible for coordinating the psychosocial care and follow-up needed. They also provide the necessary assistance immediately after the incident. You have the right to such assistance by law.

The need for psychosocial follow-up immediately after the incident varies. You will therefore be offered services adapted to your circumstances, needs and situation.
Your municipality is responsible for coordinating all the necessary psychosocial care needed, such as:

  • Early support to prevent and reduce mental health problems.
    • This means that your municipality will contact you directly to offer support and assistance soon after the incident.
    • If for any reason you turn down the offer of support immediately after the incident, you will be contacted again.
  • Ensure that you have a named contact who will be responsible for the continuity and stability of your follow-up.

You have the right to be involved in decisions about psychosocial follow-up, and it must be adapted to you personally. 

Right to essential healthcare

If you need additional or long-term follow-up, you may also be entitled to essential healthcare from the specialist health service. To be entitled to healthcare, you must meet two conditions:

  • You are expected to benefit from the healthcare.
  • The expected cost of the healthcare is in reasonable proportion to the expected benefit to you

An individual clinical assessment will be made as to whether you need healthcare from the specialist health service. The assessment covers aspects such as your physical, mental and social capacity.

How to access the care services you need

In the event of major incidents and crises, the municipalities establish crisis teams. If your municipality does not know that you were involved in the incident, you should contact them yourself for follow-up. See your municipality’s website for details.

You can also contact your GP, who will refer you to the service you need.

Right to appeal

You have the right to appeal if you believe your rights as a patient have not been upheld, or if you believe you have not received the health or care services you are entitled to. Your next of kin may also have the right to appeal on your behalf. If you have been denied access to health or care services you believe you are entitled to, you can send an appeal to the person who turned you down. 

The Health and Social Services Ombudsman can assist you by assessing your case and providing advice and guidance.

Do you need someone to talk to?

There are several helplines, chat services and support groups where you can share your thoughts and feelings anonymously, and get support, advice and guidance.

For children and young people:

Here you will find several helplines, chat services and support groups that can help when you are struggling (ung.no).

Content provided by The Norwegian Directorate of Health

The Norwegian Directorate of Health. Healthcare following crises, accidents and disasters. [Internet]. Oslo: The Norwegian Directorate of Health; updated Friday, September 16, 2022 [retrieved Friday, March 1, 2024]. Available from: https://www.helsenorge.no/en/psykisk-helse/help-if-you-are-struggling-with-mental-health/healthcare-crises-accidents-disasters/

Last updated Friday, September 16, 2022