Driving licence and health requirements

Anyone applying for a driving licence must complete a personal health statement about their health and then send it electronically to the Norwegian Public Roads Administration or deliver it to a Driver and Vehicle Licensing Office. If you have an illness or medical condition which could affect your ability to drive, you must also obtain a medical certificate from a doctor.

Older couple driving a car

You will also need a medical certificate from a doctor if you wish to expand or renew your driving licence for vehicles in heavy classes or if you wish to renew your driving licence after your 80th birthday.

Anyone applying for a driving licence in groups 2 and 3 must also always obtain a medical certificate from a doctor.

The doctor will assess whether you meet the health requirements and provide the Norwegian Public Road Administration with an "expert assessment". It is the Norwegian Public Road Administration which is responsible for deciding whether or not you should be issued with a driving licence.

Diabetes – medical requirements for driving licences

Diabetes patients are at a slightly greater risk of being involved in a road traffic accident, especially when they are taking medicines such as insulin which can cause low blood sugar levels (hypoglycaemia). Diabetes patients who have experienced seizures as a result of severe hypoglycaemia, i.e. a seizure that is so severe that they require assistance from other people, should be assessed and treated by a doctor to ensure they do not suffer any further seizures.

Drivers of heavy vehicles (driving licence groups 2 and 3) must present a log covering the last three months in order to be issued with a medical certificate.

Read more about driving licences and diabetes in the driving licence guide (helsedirektoratet.no).

Medicines – health requirements for driving licences

Sedatives, painkillers and sleeping medication can cause drivers to behave dangerously on the roads. Drivers who are taking certain types of addictive drugs such as sedatives in the "benzodiazepines" group in large doses or who regularly take such medication several times a day, must either stop, reduce their dose or switch to another medication in order to continue driving.

Contact your doctor if you wish to stop, reduce your dose or change your medicine.

Read more about driving licences and medicines in the driving licence guide (helsedirektoratet.no).

Sleep – health requirements for driving licences

​Drivers who often feel sleepy during the daytime or while driving are more likely to being involved in road traffic accidents than others. This particularly applies to patients with sleep apnoea or narcolepsy.

The most severe cases must be considered by a specialist in order to determine whether the patient meets the health requirements. Your GP is responsible for assessing whether referral to a specialist is necessary. This will happen when you apply for a driving licence for the first time, and when you need to renew your driving licence.

Read more about driving licences and sleep in the driving licence guide (helsedirektoratet.no).

​COPD – health requirements for driving licences

Some patients with severe COPD or other types of lung failure can become less alert and have less stamina when driving. A GP or specialist must measure and assess the lung function of these patients.

Read more about driving licences and COPD in the driving licence guide (helsedirektoratet.no).

Dementia – health requirements for driving licences

In order to drive safely, good cognitive functions are important, so that you are able to rapidly assess traffic situations as they develop and respond appropriately. Various types of dementia, such as Alzheimer's, and other neurological disorders can affect a person’s cognitive functions.

Doctors will assess the ability of the applicant to think and react in traffic. The requirement regarding the assessment of such functions also applies to applicant groups other than those who may be showing the early symptoms of dementia.

Read more about driving licences and dementia in the driving licence guide (helsedirektoratet.no).

Mental developmental disability – health requirements for driving licences

In order to drive safely, it is important that you are able to rapidly assess and understand traffic situations as they develop and respond appropriately. This can be difficult for anyone with a developmental disability. It is therefore a requirement that anyone who has been diagnosed with a mental developmental disability is examined by an appropriate specialist, in order to assess whether they fulfil the health requirements for being issued with a driving licence.

This assessment will primarily be relevant for anyone with a mild mental developmental disability. The assessment only applies to group 1 driving licences.

Persons with a developmental disability do not fulfil the health requirements for a group 2 or 3 driving licence, due to the stricter requirements that apply regarding road safety. It is important to be aware of this when choosing an education and/or occupation.

The health requirements for driving licences also apply to learner drivers.

Read more about driving licences and mental development disabilities in the driving licence guide (helsedirektoratet.no).

Other medical disorders and conditions – health requirements for driving licences

In the case of other medical disorders or conditions such as stroke or cardiovascular disease, the doctor will assess whether the condition could have consequences regarding the person’s ability to drive.

Some mental illnesses and conditions such as psychosis and schizophrenia can affect driving ability and road safety. Anyone with ADHD who does not also have one or more behavioural disorders will usually meet the health requirements. The doctor must assess whether the health requirements are met.

Renewal of driving licence after reaching the age of 80

​If you wish to continue driving after the age of 80, you must undergo a medical examination which is conducted by your GP or other doctor. If you meet the health requirements, your doctor will issue you with a medical certificate which is valid for up to three years.

After the appointment with the doctor, you must report to one of the Norwegian Public Roads Administration's Driver and Vehicle Licensing Offices and present your medical certificate. The medical certificate cannot be more than three months old at the time you hand it over. You will be issued with a new driving licence with an expiry date based on the medical certificate.

In the event of subsequent renewal, the same process of obtaining another medical certificate and driving licence must be followed. Renewal must take place before the stated expiry date in order to be permitted to continue driving without interruption.

Remember that no one may drive a vehicle if they have a short-term illness or health impairment or if they are taking medication which could affect their ability to drive safely. The doctor will be obliged to notify the County Governor if you do not meet the health requirements for a driving licence for an extended period of time (more than six months).